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Articles

Silence on Silence Day
  – Jenny Keating

Burned by Beauty
  – Buck Busfield

CCCs
  – Billy Goodrum

Amartithi
  – Bruce Felknor

"You'll find Me in the garden"
  – Jenny Keating

'Heart Tires of Its Gaudy Dress' – Francis Brabazon
  – Buck Busfield

HOLLYWOOD
  – Billy Goodrum

Trust and Intimacy
  – Jenny Keating

Living with Baba
  – Bruce Felknor

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words
  – Buck Busfield

Suffering and Service
  – Juniper Lesnik

SPOILER ALERT
  – Billy Goodrum

The charm of His ways. . .
  – Jenny Keating

The Importance of Being Furnished
  – Bruce Felknor

It's Been Fun
  – Steve Klein

Let’s Talk about Love
  – Juniper Lesnik

Cannes
  – Billy Goodrum

In the world but not of it . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Give Me Your Imperfections
  – Wendy Connor

Children of the One God
  – Bruce Felknor

As the Poet Says
  – Steve Klein

Happy Endings
  – Jenny Keating

Thoughts on Furniture
  – Billy Goodrum

Going Home
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Tale of Two Connections
  – Bruce Felknor

The Flowering Seed
  – Wendy Connor

Baby Steps
  – Steve Klein

Patience
  – Jenny Keating

Hold On!
  – Juniper Lesnik

Waiting for the New Humanity
  – Billy Goodrum

Remembering
  – Bruce Felknor

The Beloved's Beloved
  – Wendy Connor

Compare and Contrast
  – Steve Klein

It's in the struggle . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Time
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Tipping Point
  – Billy Goodrum

Learning Poise
  – Bruce Felknor

When "Good Enough" Isn't
  – Steve Klein

Conflict and Joy
  – Jenny Keating

Sleepless in San Jose
  – Juniper Lesnik

Vacation Incarnation
  – Steve Klein

Nerve Endings of the Soul
  – Jenny Keating

"Let the World Wait"
  – Wendy Connor

Religion vs Spirituality
  – Steve Klein

The Bigger Challenge
  – Wendy Connor

Que Sera Sera
  – Steve Klein

To Be Honest
  – Juniper Lesnik

Praise and Blame
  – Steve Klein

Being Right
  – Steve Klein

To Love God is To Love Our Fellow Beings
  – Juniper Lesnik

God is Alive in the World
  – Wendy Connor

Determined to Be His
  – Steve Klein

The Stuff We're Made Of
  – Juniper Lesnik

"I Will Always Be With You": Memories of the East West Gathering
  – Wendy Connor

Half Full or Half Empty?
  – Steve Klein

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

Ordinary Life
  – Juniper Lesnik

Baba Loved Us Too
  – Wendy Connor

Feeling His Love
  – Steve Klein

He is both Father and Mother
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Leap of Faith
  – Wendy Connor

Becoming His
  – Steve Klein

Don't Worry, Be Happy
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Life Worth Living
  – Wendy Connor

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

What a Mighty Beloved our Beloved is
  – Wendy Connor

To thine own self be true?
  – Steve Klein

The Sweets of His Love
  – Wendy Connor

Sickness and Health
  – Juniper Lesnik

Giving Advice
  – Steve Klein

"Garlic-Faced"
  – Wendy Connor

To Love and Be Loved
  – Juniper Lesnik

Talking About The Truth
  – Steve Klein

The Script was Written Long Ago
  – Wendy Connor

Excuse Me, Which Way to God?
  – Steve Klein

Letting Go
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Mosquitoes are Bad Today
  – Wendy Connor

What If A Teaching Moment Never Comes?
  – Steve Klein

Beads On One String
  – Juniper Lesnik

Youth Sahavas '07
  – Wendy Connor

Stop, You're Both Right!
  – Steve Klein

God, Please Give me a Job
  – Juniper Lesnik

"It Just Passes More Quickly"
  – Wendy Connor

Multiple Meher Babas
  – Steve Klein

Winking Back
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Treasure Within
  – Wendy Connor

Holding On, But Losing One's Grip
  – Steve Klein

1969
  – Ann Conlon

Obedience
  – Ann Conlon

Meher Center – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

Armageddon, Anyone?
  – Ann Conlon

What Does Baba Want Me to Do?
  – Ann Conlon

Baba's 'Things'
  – Ann Conlon

The Way It Was – Meherabad
  – Ann Conlon

What Does THAT Mean?
  – Ann Conlon

Doing "Baba Work"
  – Ann Conlon

Broken Heads
  – Ann Conlon

Enid
  – Ann Conlon

On Being Ill
  – Ann Conlon

To Each His Own
  – Ann Conlon

Meherjee
  – Ann Conlon

Youth Sahavas
  – Ann Conlon

Kitty
  – Ann Conlon

The Lonely Path
  – Ann Conlon

Isn't He Enough?
  – Ann Conlon

He Said What?
  – Ann Conlon

Goher
  – Ann Conlon

Taking a Dare
  – Ann Conlon

Seeking Suffering
  – Ann Conlon

Dreams
  – Ann Conlon

Amartithi
  – Ann Conlon

Margaret
  – Ann Conlon

"The Disciple"
  – Ann Conlon

I Wonder ...
  – Ann Conlon

Backbiting, etc.
  – Ann Conlon

Hearing His Name
  – Ann Conlon

Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies
  – Ann Conlon

"Baba's Group"
  – Ann Conlon

His Promise
  – Ann Conlon

Then and Now
  – Ann Conlon

Middlemen Revisited
  – Ann Conlon

Padri
  – Ann Conlon

Gateway Days
  – Ann Conlon

The New Life
  – Ann Conlon

Books, Books and More Books
  – Ann Conlon

Elizabeth Patterson
  – Ann Conlon

His "Last Warning"
  – Ann Conlon

Detachment
  – Ann Conlon

Is That A Religion Coming?
  – Ann Conlon

Manifestation: Did He Or Didn't He?
  – Ann Conlon

A Country of Our Own?
  – Ann Conlon

Remembering Mohammed
  – Ann Conlon

Advice (Sort-Of) for Newcomers
  – Ann Conlon

You're a Baba Lover If...
  – Ann Conlon

Real Happiness
  – Ann Conlon

Baba Lover, Baba Follower or Both?
  – Ann Conlon

Meherazad – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

The Strongest Memories
  – Ann Conlon

All (Baba) Things Considered

As the Poet Says

As the poet once said, “Whatever you can say about spirituality, the opposite is also true.”  Well, actually that wasn't a poet; I said it, but it still seems a valid point. Because what individuals need depends on their specific sanskaras: one disciple might be asked to fast while another may have no restrictions of any kind.  To an outside observer this can be confusing.  More so since the world is under the domain of illusion, or duality, so that we tend to see things as “either, or.”  Whereas it is more apt to see things as “yes, and” because reality is about unity.

In our every day world, something either is, or is not.  In spiritual life, it can be both simultaneously.  In the world, the claims of a hundred people will always outweigh the claims of a single person.  In spiritual terms, one person is equal to the whole so there can be no numerical comparison.  Baba would often consider the smallest problem as if it were the most important thing in the world, and then seemingly dismiss the most momentous happening in the world as if it were of no importance.

This can make it very confusing when trying to figure out how one should behave in the world.  Just the other day a Baba friend asked, “But how do we know what we should do?” Different answers came to my mind, and all of them seemed potentially both right and wrong.  Of course, I had no way of knowing what to say, as only a Master knows what is appropriate for a specific individual in a specific instance.  But it led me to think about what might be a good answer.  And it struck me that part of the problem is that the question is wrong.  When people asked the mandali what they had gained by following Baba, they had no idea what to say.  Baba told them that there was no good answer because the question was wrong.  The question should have been, “What have you lost?”
Similarly, I think we can't get a right answer to the question of, “What should I do?” because it is the wrong question.  A better question is, “How should I be?”

 And the answer to that is, “loving.”  Now, what you do to express that love may be any number of things and it may be completely different depending on you, the person you're interacting with, and the circumstances under which you're doing so.  The Buddha talked about “skill in means,” which I take to mean that it is not enough to simply have a loving impulse, but that there is a certain “skill” involved in learning how to adequately express it.  Baba says there is an “art” to right adjustment with others.  To me, this implies that there is no easy answer as to “what to do” in any situation.  We have to experiment.  We have to try our best and be willing to face our failures and learn from them. What worked in one situation may be a complete disaster in what seemed like an almost identical situation. 

The story Mani used to tell about her childhood friend Mary pops into my head.  Since they were best friends, and since Mary seemed to love Jesus wholeheartedly, it suddenly occurred to Mani that the best thing she could do would be to tell Mary the good news that her brother, Baba, was Jesus come again.  This, to put it mildly, didn't go over very well and Mary stopped talking to Mani.

Of course, at a deeper level, this may have been the best thing Mani could have done, bringing Baba's name to her friend.  The difficulty is that, from a worldly point of view, it is almost impossible to judge these things accurately.  What seems easier to assess is our motive.  Were we trying to make the other person feel Baba's love?

How often have you heard someone (or yourself) rationalize some interaction with another, which did not go particularly well, with the words, “I was only trying to help?”  That may very well be true, but were we trying to be loving?    Despite the circumstances, underneath all the details, was my primary goal to make another feel Baba's love?

For me, this is a yardstick that actually gives accurate measurement.  Not only that, but I find that trying to focus on making others feel Baba's love, as opposed to accomplishing some specific goal, changes the way I see the whole situation.  It even changes the way I feel about the situation and the other people involved.  To a very large extent, it even addresses the question, “What should I do?”  Not that it gives me an answer, but it places the “doing” in its proper subordinate role.  And when “what should I do” takes a back seat to “how can I make them feel loved?” we find that our mind has to subordinate itself to our heart which seems a great improvement.  Sometimes, because we are no longer trying to figure things out, we become more receptive to the promptings of our heart and we spontaneously do something that might never have occurred to us otherwise. Sometimes it seems to work, sometimes it doesn't.  But even when it doesn't work out, I find that the action feels more like it is between me and Baba than me and the other person and that too seems like a good thing.

At least this is how it looks to me and my specific sanskaric make up at this moment.  You might not see it this way.  But as the poet says . . . .