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Articles

Silence on Silence Day
  – Jenny Keating

Burned by Beauty
  – Buck Busfield

CCCs
  – Billy Goodrum

Amartithi
  – Bruce Felknor

"You'll find Me in the garden"
  – Jenny Keating

'Heart Tires of Its Gaudy Dress' – Francis Brabazon
  – Buck Busfield

HOLLYWOOD
  – Billy Goodrum

Trust and Intimacy
  – Jenny Keating

Living with Baba
  – Bruce Felknor

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words
  – Buck Busfield

Suffering and Service
  – Juniper Lesnik

SPOILER ALERT
  – Billy Goodrum

The charm of His ways. . .
  – Jenny Keating

The Importance of Being Furnished
  – Bruce Felknor

It's Been Fun
  – Steve Klein

Let’s Talk about Love
  – Juniper Lesnik

Cannes
  – Billy Goodrum

In the world but not of it . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Give Me Your Imperfections
  – Wendy Connor

Children of the One God
  – Bruce Felknor

As the Poet Says
  – Steve Klein

Happy Endings
  – Jenny Keating

Thoughts on Furniture
  – Billy Goodrum

Going Home
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Tale of Two Connections
  – Bruce Felknor

The Flowering Seed
  – Wendy Connor

Baby Steps
  – Steve Klein

Patience
  – Jenny Keating

Hold On!
  – Juniper Lesnik

Waiting for the New Humanity
  – Billy Goodrum

Remembering
  – Bruce Felknor

The Beloved's Beloved
  – Wendy Connor

Compare and Contrast
  – Steve Klein

It's in the struggle . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Time
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Tipping Point
  – Billy Goodrum

Learning Poise
  – Bruce Felknor

When "Good Enough" Isn't
  – Steve Klein

Conflict and Joy
  – Jenny Keating

Sleepless in San Jose
  – Juniper Lesnik

Vacation Incarnation
  – Steve Klein

Nerve Endings of the Soul
  – Jenny Keating

"Let the World Wait"
  – Wendy Connor

Religion vs Spirituality
  – Steve Klein

The Bigger Challenge
  – Wendy Connor

Que Sera Sera
  – Steve Klein

To Be Honest
  – Juniper Lesnik

Praise and Blame
  – Steve Klein

Being Right
  – Steve Klein

To Love God is To Love Our Fellow Beings
  – Juniper Lesnik

God is Alive in the World
  – Wendy Connor

Determined to Be His
  – Steve Klein

The Stuff We're Made Of
  – Juniper Lesnik

"I Will Always Be With You": Memories of the East West Gathering
  – Wendy Connor

Half Full or Half Empty?
  – Steve Klein

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

Ordinary Life
  – Juniper Lesnik

Baba Loved Us Too
  – Wendy Connor

Feeling His Love
  – Steve Klein

He is both Father and Mother
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Leap of Faith
  – Wendy Connor

Becoming His
  – Steve Klein

Don't Worry, Be Happy
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Life Worth Living
  – Wendy Connor

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

What a Mighty Beloved our Beloved is
  – Wendy Connor

To thine own self be true?
  – Steve Klein

The Sweets of His Love
  – Wendy Connor

Sickness and Health
  – Juniper Lesnik

Giving Advice
  – Steve Klein

"Garlic-Faced"
  – Wendy Connor

To Love and Be Loved
  – Juniper Lesnik

Talking About The Truth
  – Steve Klein

The Script was Written Long Ago
  – Wendy Connor

Excuse Me, Which Way to God?
  – Steve Klein

Letting Go
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Mosquitoes are Bad Today
  – Wendy Connor

What If A Teaching Moment Never Comes?
  – Steve Klein

Beads On One String
  – Juniper Lesnik

Youth Sahavas '07
  – Wendy Connor

Stop, You're Both Right!
  – Steve Klein

God, Please Give me a Job
  – Juniper Lesnik

"It Just Passes More Quickly"
  – Wendy Connor

Multiple Meher Babas
  – Steve Klein

Winking Back
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Treasure Within
  – Wendy Connor

Holding On, But Losing One's Grip
  – Steve Klein

1969
  – Ann Conlon

Obedience
  – Ann Conlon

Meher Center – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

Armageddon, Anyone?
  – Ann Conlon

What Does Baba Want Me to Do?
  – Ann Conlon

Baba's 'Things'
  – Ann Conlon

The Way It Was – Meherabad
  – Ann Conlon

What Does THAT Mean?
  – Ann Conlon

Doing "Baba Work"
  – Ann Conlon

Broken Heads
  – Ann Conlon

Enid
  – Ann Conlon

On Being Ill
  – Ann Conlon

To Each His Own
  – Ann Conlon

Meherjee
  – Ann Conlon

Youth Sahavas
  – Ann Conlon

Kitty
  – Ann Conlon

The Lonely Path
  – Ann Conlon

Isn't He Enough?
  – Ann Conlon

He Said What?
  – Ann Conlon

Goher
  – Ann Conlon

Taking a Dare
  – Ann Conlon

Seeking Suffering
  – Ann Conlon

Dreams
  – Ann Conlon

Amartithi
  – Ann Conlon

Margaret
  – Ann Conlon

"The Disciple"
  – Ann Conlon

I Wonder ...
  – Ann Conlon

Backbiting, etc.
  – Ann Conlon

Hearing His Name
  – Ann Conlon

Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies
  – Ann Conlon

"Baba's Group"
  – Ann Conlon

His Promise
  – Ann Conlon

Then and Now
  – Ann Conlon

Middlemen Revisited
  – Ann Conlon

Padri
  – Ann Conlon

Gateway Days
  – Ann Conlon

The New Life
  – Ann Conlon

Books, Books and More Books
  – Ann Conlon

Elizabeth Patterson
  – Ann Conlon

His "Last Warning"
  – Ann Conlon

Detachment
  – Ann Conlon

Is That A Religion Coming?
  – Ann Conlon

Manifestation: Did He Or Didn't He?
  – Ann Conlon

A Country of Our Own?
  – Ann Conlon

Remembering Mohammed
  – Ann Conlon

Advice (Sort-Of) for Newcomers
  – Ann Conlon

You're a Baba Lover If...
  – Ann Conlon

Real Happiness
  – Ann Conlon

Baba Lover, Baba Follower or Both?
  – Ann Conlon

Meherazad – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

The Strongest Memories
  – Ann Conlon

All (Baba) Things Considered

Gateway Days

Anyone who comes to the Meher Spiritual Center knows The Gateway is the Center's office where you check in on arrival and check out on departure. It's the hub of information and assistance for Center guests.

I worked there full-time for seven years, 1976 to 1983, and off and on as a volunteer for a few years before that. My first full-time job was as the Gateway's secretary and it was supposed to be temporary. I was there only a few months, working with Fred Winterfeldt, when Fred died, a heartfelt loss for all those guests who had experienced Fred's bear-hug welcome and sympathetic ear. Suddenly I was thrust into his role and I quickly learned it could be a tough one. Elizabeth Patterson told me I was "the lion at the gate" and my job was to protect the Center guests from anything or anyone that might disturb their retreats. I did my best to carry out that charge and I do remember the people to whom I refused entry and the people whom I removed from the Center for breaking that "do not disturb" rule. Most of those incidents were very sad as the people involved were emotionally disturbed. Baba himself did not allow emotionally disturbed people to stay in his ashram because such a spiritually charged atmosphere was too much for them. I certainly found that to be true at the Center. Visitors who came only slightly emotionally shaky quickly lost what little poise they had. Which usually meant calling the parents to come and get them, sending them home with an escort, or, in the most serious cases, getting local mental health help.

There weren't that many serious cases when I was there until the last few months and then there were many, eight of them the last five days I was there. One I remember very well, because it also had its humorous aspect. A young man who had previously toured the Center with his comparative religion class, arrived one morning, asking to stay on the Center and asking me to take his car keys so he couldn't leave. Hmm.

I had him sit down and as we talked he said he was "on the eighth plane." I didn't have the heart to tell him there were only seven. Finally, it became clear what was going on. He was a "professional college student," who was married and his wife was expecting their first child. Life had hit with a vengeance, and he was simply running away. I managed to get him to leave quietly, then called the professor of his religion class, who was aware of the young man's problem and promised to follow up on it.

The tough ones aren't the only ones I remember, though. The most powerful memories are of people tangibly touched by Baba's hand. One Saturday, I was in the Original Kitchen, serving as a tour guide, while Marshall Hay was staffing the Gateway. He called to tell me two Baba followers we knew were bringing in a new person, a young woman, and Marshall wasn't sure what was going on with her because she couldn't stop crying. I met them near the Refectory and, sure enough, she was still crying and the two young men looked very worried. They said their friend had started crying when they were still a hundred miles from the Center. I asked the girl if she wanted to walk around the Center a bit. She nodded and we went on a walking tour with her wordless and crying all the way. They left after an hour or so and I knew I'd seen an extraordinary example of Meher Baba reaching out and touching someone.

I remember a similar incident. A newcomer went into the Lagoon Cabin and came out weeping, unable to stop. Someone called Kitty Davy and asked what to do. "Nothing," Kitty said, "and don't try to explain it to her. This is Baba's doing."

Another time, a young man came for the first time and I let him go into the Lagoon Cabin by himself. He came rushing out after only a few minutes, saying, "You really shouldn't burn incense in there; it's overwhelming." He went white when I told him there was no incense, and he left in a hurry.

There were many other times when I saw people arrive exhausted and depleted and then saw them when they left a few days or weeks later, vibrant and glowing. Baba had told us to come often to his centers to fill our cups.

And that's what we all do, over and over again, refilling our cups from his bottomless pitcher. In my seven years in the Gateway, it was my privilege to witness the miracle of the endless outpouring of Meher Baba's restorative love.